Take care of the rounds

January 16, 2019

Book information: ‘Take care of the rounds’, 2015, 1/1, 20 pages, collection of collaged postcards, 10 x 8 x 1.5 cms.

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Stayed

Mapping forms a central part of my practice. This book contains a series of rotating collages based on drawings of trees, building works and OS maps.

This book was hand bound using a flexagon binding. Book information: ‘Stayed’, 2015, edition of 3, 12 pages, printed collages on card, 15 x 8 x 1.5 cms.

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Contact

December 13, 2018

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Mosquito Press

April 21, 2017

In 1916, the printed word was the dominant means of communication with newspapers, posters, fliers, postcards on every street corner – and it was a key tool for activists to report what was actually happening on the ground.

Guerilla printing presses produced cheap, short-lived newspapers to disseminate their message – one that was anti-authoritarian and radical. These newspapers became known as the “Mosquito Press” by the authorities. As soon as the authorities shut one down, another onw took tis palce. Like mosquitos, these presses were small but left a stinging bite.

As part of the March for Choice 2016, I organised, set-up and facilitated a 1916-style Mosquito Press to capture the spirit of the day by creating a living, breathing newspaper.

March attendees created drawings, articles, puzzles, poetry and more – capturing the emothion of the day. These were coupled with submissioins that had been selected as part of an Open Submission Callout. All these creative contributions were cut and pasted – old-school style – by a team of Copy Girls and Boys creating a limited edition newspaper.

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Recognition

December 04, 2013

This book explores notions of self awareness and the social construct of personal identity around one’s mirror image.

This book was hand bound using a Drum Leaf binding. Book information: ‘Recognition’, 2013, edition of 10, 16 pages, collection of drawings and collages, 138 x 196 x 17 mm.

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Invisible Lines

This book documents Uncommon Land, an urban intervention project that I led. This project explores how public space is used and controlled and in particular, how privatised public space is regulated.

Through flash mob events, online mapping and video documentation, Uncommon Land aims to explore the growing trend of pseudo-public spaces governed by their own set of rules and regulations. The project invites members of the public to participate in acts that are normally unremarkable, but that are locally contested because of the legal status of the area in which they are carried out. The project tests the boundaries of what is arbitrarily forbidden within certain spaces in the city.

This book was hand bound using altered accordion structure. Book information: ‘Invisible Lines’, 2012, varied edition of 6, 22 pages, vinyl photographs, drawings and collages, 140 x 140 x 10 mm.

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CAP publication

May 29, 2012

 

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Visual Artists’ Newsletter article

 

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Circa Art magazine review

May 28, 2012

 

 

 

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Uncommon Land

Uncommon Land is an urban intervention project which explores how public space is used and controlled and in particular, how pseudo-public space is regulated. Ownership and control of public spaces and public services are gradually being transferred to private corporations. Often this transfer of power alters how the public perceives and uses the city, especially these privately owned ‘public’ areas.

This project seeks to question the subdivisions that exist within cities, highlighting the invisible borders between public and private streets. It is intended to be an intervention into the politics of these spaces, a polite confrontation with the highly controlled and privately-policed nature of these zones.

Through flash mob events, online mapping and video documentation, Uncommon Land aims to explore the growing trend of pseudo-public spaces governed by their own set of rules and regulations. The project invites members of the public to participate in acts that are normally unremarkable, but that are locally contested because of the legal status of the area in which they are carried out. The project tests the boundaries of what is arbitrarily forbidden within certain spaces in the city.

Many of the interventions focus on the act of taking a photograph. This apparently simple act is often forbidden in these pseudo-public areas. These events poke fun at the space’s sterile, controlled environment, momentarily interrupting its flow. It also briefly reverses the power dynamic of a space in which members of the public are filmed on CCTV while being restricted from certain activities.

Uncommon Land locates itself on the intersection between the virtual and physical worlds. Among the problems it seeks to address is a duality or contradiction between the physical (streets that appear to be public) and the virtual (invisible boundaries imposed on the urban landscape that render those streets private). This duality is mirrored by the form and presentation of this artistic intervention. The installations explore the interplay between these virtual and physical worlds: the virtual map created by the participants’ geo-tagged photographs and video footage is transferred back into the physical realm through the creation of a pencil-drawn map, walks around invisible borders in an area are mapped virtually using GPS systems.

There is also a temporal duality at work: the intervention into the urban space lasts only a few minutes, but the use of technology to upload and tag the photo and video material creates a long-term presence on the internet. The laborious and repetitive process of recording this information online, playfully subverts the hyper-efficiency of these online tools.

Please see http://uncommonland.wordpress.com for more information.


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